Bread Formulation and More


If you want to successfully make bread, you have to know more about its composition and chemistry. There are different ingredients that have relative effects to the process. Choosing the right ones will result to delicious bread with good form that keeps for several days or weeks. You have to learn the balance between the ingredients to get the most benefits possible.

About Bread Chemistry

The amount of flour and water is very important when making bread, since these change the crumb and texture of the bread. Professional bakers use a system of percentages called Bakers' Percentage when following recipes and making formulations. They measure all the ingredients according to weight instead of volume. Measuring by weight becomes more accurate and consistent, compared to volume measuring. Dry ingredients are also easier to measure when weighed.

Flour always has 100% and all other ingredients get a percentage of that amount according to weight. The common table bread in America uses about 50% water, leading to light and finely textured bread. A lot of artisan bread formulas also have 60% to 75% water. In yeast bread types, high water percentages lead to CO2 bubbles, plus a coarser bread crumb. One pound of flour will result to a regular loaf bread or 2 french loaves.

Knowing Bread Flour

Flour is a product created from grain which has been ground into a powdery consistent form. Flour gives the primary structure to the final baked bread. Common available flours are created from barley, maize, rye and other grains. Wheat flour is the most commonly used for breads, with each of the grains giving protein and starch to the resulting product.

Wheat flour, aside from its starch, also has 3 water soluble protein groups, globulin, albumin, proteoses and 2 non-water soluble protein groups called gliadin and glutenin. When flour mixes with water, the water-soluble proteins dissolve, which trigger gliadin and glutenin to create the structure of the remaining dough. Glutenin creates strands of long thin and chain-like molecules when kneaded, while gliadin creates bridges between glutenin strands. The networks of strands create by the 2 proteins are called gluten. Gluten boosts the quality of the dough.

About Bread Liquids

Water or any other liquid can be used to create the flour and turn it into dough or a paste. The volume of liquid needed will change between recipes, although a ratio of 1 cup of liquid to 3 flour cups is basic for yeast breads. Recipes using steam as a main leavening procedure can have liquid content in excess of 1 part liquid to 1 part flour according to volume. Aside from water, other liquids can be used such as fruit juice, dairy products and orbeer. These can provide added fats, sweeteners and leavening components.

Bread Recipes

Bread recipes will differ, but it is important that you stick to the ratios provided. You will find that later on, you can change the amounts slightly to get the right consistency, flavor and texture that you prefer. Some countries have varying components to provide more uniqueness and creativity to the mix.


Other Bread Making and Your Life Articles

How to Make Bread
The Sourdough Starter Recipe
The Bread Leavening Process
On Breadmaking Ingredients
Making Cinnamon Bread Rolls
The Processes of Making Whole Wheat Bread
Making Sourdough
How to Make Whole Wheat Bread
Bread Sourdough and Leavening
Sourdough Starters and Bread Recipes
Comparing Sourdough and Sourbread
How to Make Cinnamon Bread Rolls
Yeast 101
Breadmaking: About Freshly Milled Grains
How to Make Cinnamon Bread
Familiarizing Baking Ingredients
How to Make Banana Bread
How to Make Breadcrumbs
Making Homemade Bread
Homemade Bread Making Tips
How to Make White Bread
How to Make Flat Bread
Understanding the Kinds of Bread
Bread Formulation and More

Bread Making and Your Emotions Videos











Site Index Page * Home Page * Privacy Policy * Conditions * Disclaimer * Contact

Disclosure: Advertisements are placed on this website to offset the cost of maintenance and to keep this site free for everyone to use. Owners of this website will receive compensation for products and services purchased through featured advertisements.
All claims of actual user results should be considered as a-typical.


© 2016 Copyrighted by OkiDoki - All Rights Worldwide Reserved!
Site and articles redirected and transformed by Hans Peter M. Mul