Potty Training An Adopted Dog


Adopting a new puppy is one of the things that bring delight and squeals from children. It is a happy occasion for both you and the family. However, a puppy, cute and squiggly as they are will, as all dogs do, mess the house. The new member of the household has to be potty trained as soon as the first day.

It is important to note that dogs could hold their bladder up to five hours, not more than that. In fact, dogs being territorial animals will mark the territory by urinating every few feet or so. When the dog is new to a particular place that has not yet been marked by other dogs, expect the dog itching to mark every nook and cranny of the house, worse, that include the rugs and carpets. The following will walk you through to potty train the pup.

Because you are expecting the pup to urinate you could very well anticipate that it is bound to happen. Once you see a pup raising a hind leg, carry him outside to a designated place where the pup could relieve himself. Typically a pup that is good for adoption is about three months old. That also means that the puppy could hold his bladder for at least three hours. Refrain from waiting for that. Bring the puppy out every two hours counting from the time when you first brought him outside. It is important to establish a routine and a schedule. Dogs respond well to schedule and routine. Routines, repetitions, and schedules are the main tools used in training.

Use the same area each time. When you are trough playing with the puppy, go to the spot. When the puppy has finished eating, go to the spot. Every two hours after that, go to the same spot. Sooner or later, the puppy will get the idea. All it takes is patience and how ready you are because bringing home a new dog to the house will take responsibility. The hardest part is just until the puppy gets used to the routine. Until then, everything hangs on your commitment to raising a housebroken dog.

Likewise, feed the dog on a regular schedule. That way you could predict and better control the time when the puppy will be relieving itself.

In the same manner, young puppies will need to relieve itself during the night. A young puppy is generally regarded as less than four months old. If so, do give water to the puppy before bedtime. Puppies that are four months or more make it overnight. When the puppy wakes up, the first urge is to urinate, bring him to the spot. After a nap, do the same. Establishing routines and getting the puppy accustomed to the spot will make him go there eventually without being led.

Even behind all these, accidents could happen. If the pup soiled a rug, a piece of paper or pieces of item, place the items in the spot. It will give the puppy the hint what the spot is for.

It is also important to praise the puppy the very moment after the puppy has relived himself in the spot designated. That will reinforce the idea and go there every time.


Other Dogs and Your Life Articles



Adopting A Dog – Companion Dogs
Adopting A Dog – Leash Training
Adopting A Dog – When The Dog Refuses To Walk
Adopting A Dog – Taking The Dog Out The First Time
Adopting A Dog – Spotting Dog Personalities
Adopting A Dog – Which Dog Is Right For You?
Adopting A Senior Dog – Giving A Retirement Home To An Aging Dog
Adopting A Dog – Guardian Dogs
Adopting A Dog – Going Through The Adoption Process
Giving A Puppy A New Home
Training A Dog – Positive And Negative Reinforcements
Things You Should Think About Before Adopting A Dog
Interesting Dog Facts
Adopting A Dog – Dog Training
What To Expect When Adopting A Dog
The Benefits Adopting A Dog From A Shelter
Adopting A Dog – The Working Dogs
Rehoming An Adult Dog
Adopting A Dog On The Spot – Deciding Which Dog to Adopt
Adopting A Dog – What Dog To Choose
Adopting A Dog – Finding That Perfect Dog
When To Not Adopt A Dog
Adopting A New Dog – Considerations You Have To Make
Potty Training An Adopted Dog
Adopting A Dog – Building A Doghouse

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